24/1/2015 8:31 pm  #1


Shakespeare

Just reading "Richard III" and Act I, Scene II the following appears:- '......and presently repair to Crosby House ...." There is an explanation to this as follows:- Richard's town house, which then stood in Bishopgate Street. It was later removed and re-erected in Chelsea, where it still stands today. ( book printed  12th printing October 1976).
So, Chelsea here we come, but where in Chelsea I wonder.

 

24/1/2015 10:59 pm  #2


Re: Shakespeare

I wonder how "crooning" was spelled in Elizabethan English?

 

25/1/2015 12:09 am  #3


Re: Shakespeare

Steve Fay wrote:

I wonder how "crooning" was spelled in Elizabethan English?

One dictionary definition says
"late 15th century (originally Scots and northern English): from Middle Low German and Middle Dutch krōnen ‘groan, lament.’ The use of croon in standard English was probably popularized by Robert Burns"

Another suggests to bellow, low, mourn or lament.

Rather different to the modern idea of soft, intimate singing!

None suggest any variants in spelling, though if you go back pre mid 17th century people would spell pretty anyway they thought words sounded, so if you spoke with a strong accent other vowels might have crept in, and the hard "c" sound might probably produce a "k". But I wonder whether it was in common enough usage to produce much variation.

 

 

25/1/2015 12:25 am  #4


Re: Shakespeare

Ron Field wrote:

Just reading "Richard III" and Act I, Scene II the following appears:- '......and presently repair to Crosby House ...." There is an explanation to this as follows:- Richard's town house, which then stood in Bishopgate Street. It was later removed and re-erected in Chelsea, where it still stands today. ( book printed 12th printing October 1976).
So, Chelsea here we come, but where in Chelsea I wonder.

Illustration of it here 

http://www.britishmuseum.org/collectionimages/AN00749/AN00749660_001_l.jpg
 
and more about the British Museum holding here 
http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/collection_online/collection_object_details.aspx?objectId=3241781&partId=1&people=110908&peoA=110908-2-23&view=list&sortBy=imageName&page=1

There are also details of a sale in 1678 of furnishings and tapestry here http://artworld.york.ac.uk/saleView.do?saleUrn=2.1588&years=1660-89

A piece about the history is here http://www.british-history.ac.uk/survey-london/bk9/pp15-32
and some modern pictures as rebuilt in Chelsea here 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/costi-londra/471590046/

It is in Cheyne Walk, Chelsea on the north bank of the Thames, and is listed as a building of historical and architectural importance. As such, authorisation would have to be given for any changes which might result in change of appearance. Cheyne Walk is busy and there is a considerable amount of traffic passing within feet of the building.

.But nothing to do with our Crosby! 

N.B. Cheyne is pronounced Chain-ee!

 

Last edited by Richard Baker (25/1/2015 12:28 am)

 

04/2/2015 6:17 pm  #5


Re: Shakespeare

Richard,
A bit slow in thanking you for that Crosby building.

     Thread Starter
 

05/2/2015 2:36 pm  #6


Re: Shakespeare

That house would make a great location for ICC headquarters.  Could we talk someone into donating it to us?  ;)

 

05/2/2015 3:06 pm  #7


Re: Shakespeare

Steve Fay wrote:

That house would make a great location for ICC headquarters.  Could we talk someone into donating it to us?  ;)

The present owner, Christopher Moran, is said to have spent well over 25,000,000 GBP (Say 38,000000 dollars) in renovations, quite apart from the original purchase. And I suspect he's not a member of the ICC.

Possibly a modest increase in subscriptions to ICC would do it? 


 

 

06/2/2015 10:50 pm  #8


Re: Shakespeare

Or maybe we could convince Mr. Moran into watching "The Bells of St. Mary's" several times and then personally following in the pattern of Mr. Bogartus?

 

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