Recording » Official UK Singles Charts Celebrates 60 Years » 23/7/2017 1:48 am

Brunswick78
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It appears that Tie a Yellow Ribbon (which I didn't even know he'd recorded) made #7 on the "Breakers" chart, a bit like Billboard's Bubbling Under.
http://www.45cat.com/record/das402

Also see my recent topic on Do You Hear What I Hear for a record that isn't listed as a hit by the OCC but did chart.

Recording » Bing with Eddie Condon - new alternate takes? » 16/7/2017 10:42 pm

Brunswick78
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Judging by the discography, it seems the Mosaic set includes the commercial 78 takes plus alternate version used on on:
GRP GRD-603 Bing Crosby, Bing Crosby and Some Jazz Friends

If a title is shown as unissued this means that the performance does exist but it is not included in this package because of damage to the original disc or because of space limitations has forced us to include only the most exceptional alternate take.

Take your pick from either of those reasons - damage, or lack of space. It's a bit confusing because of their lack of quote marks, but unissued, master no longer exists is noted where that is the case. 

Recording » Official UK Singles Charts Celebrates 60 Years » 28/6/2017 7:54 am

Brunswick78
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Thanks for conforming that. It makes more sense than it being the Mischa Spoliansky song!

Recording » Do You Hear What I Hear? » 28/6/2017 12:55 am

Brunswick78
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I notice that Richard Baker is interested in Bing's chart performance, so I thought I'd post an addition to his "official" UK chart hits (from 1952 onwards as published by Guinness). Other magazines compiled their own charts, and it wasn't until 1969 that the record industry settled on one "official" chart. So Bing's 1950s hits are from New Musical Express, who launched the UK chart in 1952. The 'official' chart states that Bing didn't have any UK hit records from Around The World in 1957 until That's What Life Is All About in 1975. However, you may (I say may, as I doubt there's much you all don't know) not be aware that during the 1960s, two other magazines listed another hit for him in their charts:

Disc Magazine 28 Dec 1963 Do You Hear What I Hear? (Capitol CL 15326) #23, 2 weeks on chart
Melody Maker  04 Jan 1964 Do You Hear What I Hear? (Capitol CL 15326) #49, 1 week on chart

Interesting to know he did register on the pop charts with a single during those 18 years!

Recording » Official UK Singles Charts Celebrates 60 Years » 28/6/2017 12:21 am

Brunswick78
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jeremyrose wrote:

Herewith Max Bygraves singing "Cowpuncher's Cantata"...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GxsQLVf8BgU

I simply can't imagine why Bing never recorded it..!!

It's a parody, but the label lists it as a medley (of which Bing performed two numbers): Cry Of The Wild Goose, Riders In The Sky (performed on Bing's radio show), Mule Train (performed on radio and recorded commercially by Bing), Jezebel. All Frankie Laine hits of course.

He also sang several other songs from that chart on the radio:

You Belong To Me
Feet Up
Because You're Mine - not sure why Copeman is credited as the songwriter, the 1952 song was by Nicholas Brodszky and Sammy Cahn
Walkin' My Baby Back Home

I note the following in the Bing discography:
Auf Wiederseh'n (Mischa Spoliansky) 
9 October 1952 Radio  
23 October 1952 Radio

Is this definitely the Mischa Spoliansky tune, which was first published in 1930? I note there are no timings, so perhaps the broadcasts don't exist to check. But I suspect it may be the 1952 Vera Lynn hit, given Bing was performing current songs on his shows, and the song had been a #1 hit for Vera on the Billboard chart from July to September of that year. John Turner and Geoffrey Parsons wrote English lyrics to the 1950 German tune by Eberhard Storch.

I collected the tracks from this chart about 10-15 years ago and the Bing one was quite hard to track down here at the time, although it turned out to be on the Spectrum Best of the Early 50's CD. This was before digital downloads became readily available. The Irish Collection may not have been easy to get either.

Swaps and Sales » The Chronological Bing Crosby Series from Jonzo - Complete Set » 27/6/2017 10:10 pm

Brunswick78
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Quite a good price for Rhian's set, £92 for the lot. I bought one of the volumes from VIP Music. It's unfortunate that they don't have the other twenty - presumably sold out? I'm interested in one they don't have for sale.

Recording » A Gal In Calico » 28/5/2017 12:06 pm

Brunswick78
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Glad to hear it, Jeremy, thanks. Actually, until listening closely to the track I also thought Calico was a place! It doesn't get much mention as a fabric these days...

Recording » A Gal In Calico » 22/5/2017 1:06 am

Brunswick78
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Having now heard the "rejected" take, I've found a more noticeable difference (the line "I'd bet-ter let 'er know" is too forensic for me to discern for sure!). 

At about 1:20, listen to the way he phrases the lyric "I'm just a country boy, and any country boy..." on both the "rejected" take and the 16 Original World Hits version. The way he sings the word 'country' the second time is notably different on these. He seems to sing 'count - ry' on the rejected take, whereas on the new Alt, I can't hear any pause in the syllables of that word. I'd also say that at about 1:55 the line "gonna quit the rodeo" he seems to pause slightly more before 'rodeo' on the rejected take. The two versions are almost identical and I'd be slightly inclined to think it could be pitching differences or transfer speeds, but like Richard, I can hear these very subtle differences. I also think that on the very final note in the outro he seems to waver/tremble on the "oh..." on the 'rejected' take, whereas it sounds smoother on the new 'alt'. I would concur that this new Alt is most likely another 'rejected' take from the earlier session. I imagine that MCA simply used the first master they found of the song on the 1989 CD.

Recording » A Gal In Calico » 19/5/2017 11:19 pm

Brunswick78
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Hello Richard, thank you for investigating this recording and sharing your findings. I'm glad you agree with me that the version on 16 Original World Hits is different, and thanks for pointing out the changed lyric. Hearing that, it's obvious. I have to admit, I don't have the "Chronological" series, so hadn't heard the "rejected alt." version.

Recording » A Gal In Calico » 18/5/2017 7:26 am

Brunswick78
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Ah, I thought the discography might have been a long-standing ICC one. Maybe Wig's printed one has more detail. I await any further thoughts from your investigation! I remember a friend of mine (a member of the ICC) had the track on an LP. Could have been the same as the CD, or maybe it's a better source for the commercial take.

I believe that in the pre-tape era, the discs used on recording were "glass masters". I believe they are also often metal. Therefore Bing's recordings up to the late 40s usually sound very "clean" and clear on "official" MCA/Universal releases, as those masters are a superior source to commercially pressed shellac 78s. There is noticeable surface noise on dubs of commercial 78s in most cases.

Recording » A Gal In Calico » 17/5/2017 11:10 pm

Brunswick78
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Hello there. I'm a younger fan of Bing, and a collector of pop hits from his era. "A Gal In Calico" was a number one on the UK's chart based on sales of sheet music. Who knows who the most popular version was by, but it was quite likely to have been Bing's. It's quite rare on CD, and usually seems to be a dub from the 78, so I consulted the discography linked to this site to see if it might have appeared from a Decca master source. That told me that it was on "16 Original World Hits", an MCA release in Germany and Australia, which I think dates from 1989. I ordered the CD from Amazon (secondhand), and the quality is better, as well as the CD also having Bing's rarer versions of some more hits from the era. It still doesn't sound as clean as other tracks on it, but more to the point, I don't think it's the commercial 78rpm version. It sounds like a different take to me, although according to the discography, it has the same master number as the 78rpm issue (printed on both the UK Brunswick and US Decca 78s). I note there was a rejected take from the previous session, master number L4134, but that's listed as 2:29, so a bit shorter than this CD version which is about 2:32 (2:37 in the database). 

If anyone has the MCA CD (the German pressing is what I have), perhaps they can listen and tell me what they think, or perhaps there's a good explanation for this. He definitely sounds as if he's singing it differently to the 78rpm version (if you go on YouTube, people have uploaded videos of both the Decca and Brunswick 78s). Case in point - at about 0:40, the way he sings the word "rodeo". On the 78s, he holds the first note of the word. This isn't evident on the CD version. As this CD dates quite far back, I'm sure one of the Crosby collectors must have noticed this alternate take. Odd too that the song was seemingly very popular, both in the UK and the US, yet was mostly neglected on CD by MCA et al.


Session detail for the recording:Date: 7 May 1946

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